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Lottery or Matka Prediction Software

Mohan Astrology Software Predict the Todays Lottery or Matka Numbers with the help of Astrological Calculation.

Lottery History

Lottery! is an American drama series that premiered on ABC on September 9, 1983. The series aired for one season of 17 episodes and starred Ben Murphy as Patrick Sean Flaherty, and Marshall Colt as Eric Rush. Lottery! Centered on ordinary people who have won the lottery—all of a sudden becoming millionaires—and how it changes their lives.

 

Each week, several guest stars become instant millionaires (in two or three different stories) when their lottery tickets bring them fame, fortune, and usually trouble. Flaherty worked for the "Intersweep Lottery," which, as he told a winner in at least one episode, was sponsored by the "Intersweep Bank." (In at least one other episode, one winner noted that the lottery was the Intersweep Lottery division of "Inter-European Bank.") His job was to find the winner(s), inform them of their winnings, and give him or her an envelope containing $5,000 in cash, and a check worth millions. In the event of ownership disputes with the winning ticket, Flaherty would also act as an arbitrator responsible for determining the true recipient in what method used to settle the matter.

Rush was Flaherty's partner, an IRS agent who oversaw the accounting of the payouts and the arrangement of the winner's tax obligations. Each episode also took place in a different city around the country. (Presumably, Inter-European Financial Services was a multi-national conglomerate, and Flaherty and Rush most likely had counterparts in other countries.)

The opening titles for the show featured large banks of computers and tape drives. Above what appeared to be a trading floor (similar to what one would see at a stock exchange) were large electronic toteboards showing the latest prizes, the winners' names, and the countries in which they lived. This flurry of activity, however, was never a part of any of the show's episodes, and Flaherty and Rush themselves were never at the Inter-European/Intersweep offices for any of the plot lines. At the end of every episode, the show displayed the following disclaimer: "The Intersweep Lottery is purely fictitious. Except for states where they are legally authorized, lotteries in this country are illegal."

The Intersweep Lottery itself was actually more akin to the Publishers Clearing House than any of the popular lottery games in the U.S. and around the world, such as the Irish Sweepstakes, which was believed to have given Rosner the idea for the series. (That both actor Ben Murphy and his character, Patrick Flaherty, were of Irish extraction, and that Murphy was sometimes shown wearing a Bowler brand derby hat, seemed to support this.) Rather than having a drawing consisting of individually numbered ping-pong balls selected by randomly ordered machines, participants in this lottery purchased numbered tickets. (The cost per ticket was not stated in the series. However, since the lottery itself was described as having a bank sponsoring it, depositors apparently received a specific number of such tickets upon opening new accounts or obtaining additional services on existing accounts.) Each ticket carried a unique serial number consisting of two letters followed by six numbers (example: AG 482 979). The drawing of winning numbers was also never featured in any of the episodes in this series.

Lottery! is not the first series to deal with the elation and challenges of sudden wealth. The basic premise is loosely similar to an earlier series, The Millionaire with Marvin Miller, except that the money was given out by a mysterious benefactor, John Beresford Tipton, to specific named individuals without the organization of a lottery, and that any taxes on the money had already been paid in advance. In 1979, NBC produced Sweepstakes, an equally short-lived series with a similar premise (it, too, lasted only a single season). In 2006, NBC tried again with Windfall, a series about a group of twenty friends winning a multimillion-dollar lottery prize—that series lasted only three months before cancellation.

Most people like to play the lottery, at least from time to time. While playing is fun, actually winning is much more exhilarating. For most of us winning is simply a chance occurrence, a stroke of luck. Know the best lottery numbers to play. How? Is it truly possible to predict lottery numbers that will win?

 

Matka History

Matka gambling or satta is a form of lottery which originally involved betting on the opening and closing rates of cotton transmitted from the New York Cotton Exchange. It originates from before the era of Indian independence when it was known as Ankada Jugar ("figures gambling"). In the 1960s, the system was replaced with other ways of generating random numbers, including pulling slips from a large earthenware pot known as a matka, or dealing playing cards.

Matka Kings

A person who has won a great deal of money from matka gambling is known as a "Matka King".

Kalyanji Bhagat

Kalyanji Bhagat was born a farmer in the village of Ratadia, Ganesh Wala in Kutch, Gujarat. Kalyanji's family name was Gala and the name Bhagat, a modification of bhakt, was a title given to their family by the King of Kutch for their religiousness.

He arrived as a migrant in Bombay in 1941 and initially did odd jobs such as masala ferriwala (spice seller) to managing a grocery store. In the 1960s, when Kalyanji Bhagat was running a grocery shop in Worli, he pioneered matka gambling by accepting bets based on the opening and closing rates of cotton traded on the New York wholesale market. He used to operate from the compound of his building Vinod Mahal, in Worli.

After Kalyanji Bhagat, his son Suresh Bhagat managed the business along with his wife Jaya Bhagat who he married in 1979.

Suresh Bhagat

On June 11, 2008, a truck rammed into a Mahindra Scorpio in which Suresh Bhagat and six others, including his lawyer and bodyguards were travelling, killing all of them. They were returning from an Alibaug court, where the hearing of a 1998 narcotics case had been held. During investigations by the police it was revealed that Hitesh Bhagat (Suresh Bhagat's son) and his mother Jaya Bhagat had hatched the plot to kill Suresh Bhagat. Hitesh and nine others, including Jaya, were arrested and were tried under the stringent act of Maharashtra Control of Organized Crime Act and subsequently convicted.

Rattan Khatri

Rattan Khatri, known as the Matka King, from the early 1960s to mid-1990s controlled a nationwide illegal gambling network with international connections which involved several lakh punters and dealt with crores of rupess.

Khatri's matka started in the bustling business area of Dhanji Street in Mumbadevi where idlers used to wager on the daily trickle of the fluctuating cotton rates from the New York market. Gradually, it became a big gambling hub as the quantum of bets and betters increased. Due to a row over a winning number plus the New York market’s five-day week schedule, compulsive betters began looking for alternatives. Based on the requests of his friends, Khatri started his own syndicate and started drawing three cards to decide the day’s number. Khatri's betting was considered more genuine as the cards were reportedly opened in the presence of the patron. During the emergency in India, Khatri was jailed and served 19 months behind bars. He has retired from the gambling business and lives near Tardeo; however, he still does visit the Mahalaxmi Racecourse to bet on his favorite horses.